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Quality, Rework, and Throughput March 3, 2014

Posted by Tim Rodgers in Process engineering, Quality, Supply chain.
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Some years ago when I was managing a software quality department I got into a heated conversation with one of my colleagues about our testing. “If your team would just stop finding defects, we can wrap up this project.” I had to point out that it wasn’t my team that introduced the defects in the first place. Of course no one deliberately does that. Software engineers want to write new code, not fix their (or anyone else’s) mistakes.

Quality isn’t only important for external customers and end-users. Internal operations should also improve quality as a way of focusing limited resources on value-added activities. In manufacturing, repair and rework are part of the “hidden factory” that reduces throughput and can prevent the plant from running profitably.

This isn’t hypothetical. At the China factory where I worked my goal was to improve end-of-line yield to the point where we could eliminate a single rework station for each production line. With more than 30 lines and 2 shifts that added up to some significant savings as well as an increase in capacity.

We’re human, mistakes will be made, and the complexity of our designs virtually guarantees that there will be unexpected outputs and interactions when we put those designs to the test in a service environment. However, we shouldn’t accept the frictional cost of fixing defects as an inherent inefficiency in the value delivery system. A defect found today is worth more than a defect found tomorrow, but a defect prevented by better design of products and processes has a far greater impact.

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